This is part 3 of a four-part series called "Surviving Your Own Copernican Shift." If you're going through a faith deconstruction - or reconstruction - or both, you need help understanding a framework for spiritual development that allows questioning, expanding, and believing new things. Part One was about understanding that disruptions are the first step of growing spiritually. Part Two was about learning how to see the invitations into new beliefs that disruptions bring.

Part Three is about seeing your belief system as a snow globe - you need to get outside of it to see its limitations and also what you're missing. 

Enjoy! 

Joanna Luehmann is a Latinx pastor and theologian who took to Twitter on Sunday night and Monday following the Superbowl to give a different perspective to the halftime show to anyone who thought it was oversexualized. She graciously agreed to talk to me with virtually zero time to prepare, and what she offered was a beautiful, challenging and timely critique to Progressive Christians like me who need to spend a little more time seeing how our own implicit biases cloud our vision. Please take some time to listen to Joanna's insightful invitation into a decolonized way of seeing the world. 

You can follow Joanna Luehmann on Twitter, Instagram, Youtube, and Patreon

Enjoy. 

Until the early 1500's, everybody assumed planet earth was the fixed, immovable center of the universe, the reference point for the entire universe (apparently it didn't occur to anybody how utterly convenient that was for those of us who lived there). When Copernicus discovered the earth was also orbiting around the sun, nothing actually changed - except how we see everything. 

This episode (disruption) is part one of a four-part series on the essential movements when you have your own Copernican shift, whether it's about religion or science or a relationship. Nobody likes life as we know it to be interrupted, but without disruption, we'd never expand how we think so we can see differently.

Enjoy. 

Andrew Bauman is the Co-Founder and Director of Christian Counseling Center: For Sexual Health and Trauma. He's a licensed mental health counselor with an M.A. in Counseling Psychology from the Seattle School of Theology and Psychology. He's also the author of several books, including Floating Away, Stumbling Toward Wholeness, The Psychology of Porn, and A Brave Lament (with Christy Bauman). 

We had a fascinating conversation about why it seems so easy for Christians to see themselves as hopeless sinners, but how hard it is to see themselves as good & glorious. We talked about why we use self-contempt and shame as a way to try to crucify ourselves because we don't really believe (even though we say we do) the work of Christ is enough. 

I can't wait for you to listen. 

You can get in touch with Andrew and the many resources he provides by visiting his website, and you can also check out his work at the Christian Counseling Center: For Sexual Health and Trauma.

Other resources mentioned in this episode: 

A Brave Lament (Documentary)

Theology of the Womb: Knowing God Through the Body of a Woman by Christy Angelle Bauman 

 

Seth Haines is one of those friends that makes me want to pursue things that really matter. His new book is vintage Seth Haines: poignant, at times snarky, and pure gold throughout, The Book of Waking Up: Experiencing the Divine Love That Reorders a Life is a beautiful call to attach yourself to a love that satisfies deep down. This is how Seth describes his new work: 

I wrote The Book of Waking Up: Experiencing the Divine Love That Reorders a Life for those who want to wake from their coping mechanisms, attachments, and addiction and wake to the Divine Love that brings true, inner sobriety. Grab a copy at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, or Bookish (my favorite independent book seller)*. Then, as you read, come back here to check out the library of books that influenced The Book of Waking Up. (And don’t forget to check out my award-winning book, Coming Clean: A Story of Faith.)

*Reminder: Consider supporting your indie booksellers.

You can follow Seth on Twitter, Instagram, and on his website

I met Aundi Kolber at the Festival for Faith and Writing in 2018, and she’s been a friend ever since. This is Aundi’s second time on the podcast, and this is how she describes herself:

I am a deep thinker and deep feeler. Sometimes I get bored with small talk. I love stories, people, counseling, theology and my precious family. I find myself constantly amazed by God’s faithfulness in my life. I write, think, and chew on this often. I believe that Jesus is my ultimate hope and healer. I am a licensed professional counselor in Castle Rock, CO and attended Denver Seminary for my graduate education. I am married to the love of my life and have a daughter and son who are the joy of my heart. My hope for this blog is to create a space to dig into hard, funny, and imperfect things. My work has been featured on Relevant, CT Women, The Huffington Post, The Mudroom, Happy Sonship and Circling the Story.

If you enjoyed my conversation with Aundi, check out her website, follow her on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram, and you can buy her brand new book, Try Softer: A Fresh Approach to Move Us out of Anxiety, Stress, and Survival Mode--and into a Life of Connection and Joy.

Click here to subscribe to my weekly newsletter, Finding God After Losing Faith.

For Stephanie Tait, pain has never existed on a spectrum opposite of joy. Pain, with the way it weaves into our lives, families, and work habits, has been the connecting point of grace and struggle that defines her career. As an author, speaker, disability advocate, and trauma survivor, Stephanie aims to do what she believes is sorely lacking in our trending conversations around Christianity – to partner sound theology and practice with the unashamed acceptance of struggle in the present tense. She aims to create space for the reality of suffering, as well as practical tools and experience for its management, in the center of our faith ethic, our communities, and our joy.

Our conversation centered around the themes of her new book, The View From Rock Bottom, and also about the subtle ways most of us buy into a kind of prosperity gospel, even though we may not realize it.

Visit Stephanie’s website or follow her on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

Buy The View from Rock Bottom here.

Click here to sign up for my weekly newsletter, Finding God After Losing Faith.

So many of us begin thinking about resolutions or "words for the year" as we wrap up one year and head into the next. One of the things that I'm going to be especially intentional about in 2020 is being rigorously honest about what I say I believe. You may not believe this, but there are many times when I simply nod along, agreeing with what I should agree with, while internally I am feeling angsty. So, I'm committing to doing the work of being kind and compassionate, while also refusing to simply go along with something I don't really believe in. 

For some reason, when I get a bee in my bonnet like this, it actually helps me to create something related to what I'm wanting in my own life so that other people can be on the journey with me. So, I'm creating a new weekly resource called Finding God After Losing Faith. Like I described on this episode, this weekly email will be designed to help people to keep searching for God even after a certain belief system - or religious system - has stopped working for them. Each week I'll share the best and most inspiring resources I'm finding that's helping me as my own faith evolves. 

This resource will be totally free, but it will only be available to my weekly email subscribers. You can subscribe by clicking here. 

December 19, 2019

Episode 211 | Advent, Part 4

The season of Advent marks the beginning of the church calendar, and it's a season of naming our deepest longings, those places in our lives where everything feels shrouded in darkness and hopelessness. It's a season to ask for light to come into those places, for Christ to come into those places. It's a season to practice waiting for the impossible to become possible. 

My conversation is with Ruth Haley Barton, a dear friend and the Director of the Transforming Center in Chicago, Illinois. 

The music on this episode is by Page CXVI (used by permission) from their album Advent to Christmas. 

December 12, 2019

Episode 210 | Advent, Part 3

The season of Advent marks the beginning of the church calendar, and it's a season of naming our deepest longings, those places in our lives where everything feels shrouded in darkness and hopelessness. It's a season to ask for light to come into those places, for Christ to come into those places. It's a season to practice waiting for the impossible to become possible. 

My conversation is with Ruth Haley Barton, a dear friend and the Director of the Transforming Center in Chicago, Illinois. 

The music on this episode is by Page CXVI (used by permission) from their album Advent to Christmas. 

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